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> Engine Block Heaters
Guest_neal_*
post Nov 9 2004, 10:16 PM
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evening,
I have recently got into the trucking business and am facing my first winter.I have an International model 4900.
i am wondering if anyone can give me advice out there with regard to engine block heaters and what I might need to do.I park my truck outside all the time.
I drive a new jersey route covering about 1000 miles a week.

thanks
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ddjtrkr
post Nov 11 2004, 02:11 PM
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My first suggestion would be to contact a GOOD IH service department in your area and discuss your concerns with them.

Before I could give you any responsible advise beyond that, I would need to know what engine you are running, what weight oil, how many batteries of what size and condition, and how does it start in the lower 40 degree range.

I don't think you need to keep it plugged in all the time. I've ran 2 Cummins N14 engines - one in an IH9400 and the current one in a KW T600 using 3 of the biggest batteries I can find, 15-40 Shell Rotella T oil and my findings have been that as long as I keep the batteries in good condiiton and fully charged, I don't need to use the block heater until it is well below zero. When it gets real cold - minus 10 and below and the truck has been setting outside for several days, I only need to run the block heater for about 1 hour to be able to start them right up.

A TIP FOR STARTING ANY LARGE TRUCK OR HEAVY EQUIPMENT ENGINE IS TO PLACE THE TRANSMISSION IN NUETRAL, HOLD THE CLUTCH DOWN WHILE STARTING THE ENGINE AND THEN SLOWLY LET THE CLUTCH OUT AFTER THE ENGINE IS RUNNING. This eliminates the internal oil drag in the transmission during starting and assures that the starter is only turning the engine and NOT trying to overcome any drag from cold grease in the transmission. EVEN MORE IMPORTANTLY, IT ABSOLUTELY PREVENTS ACCIDENTLY STARTING IN GEAR IF THE LOCK OUTS FAIL.

GOOD LUCK - not only with the cold starting but with all of the challenges that you will face in your new business. It can be very rewarding, but I can almost gaurantee you that it will be challenging and at times frustrating. TRY TO FIND SOMEONE WHO IS SUCCESSFULLY RUNNING A SIMILAR TRUCKING BUSINESS, BECOME CLOSE TO THEM AND USE THEM FOR ADVICE! If you do NOT let them feel that you are a threat and show that you appreciate their help, you will find that most of us are willing to help newcomers as much as we can. I can't give you any real detailed advice because we run class 8 trucks (80,000#) from WA state to TX, GA and empty out in FL on a dedicated run, then whatever it takes to get back home for the next run, and my operation has no relationship to yours.

Don Jones

This post has been edited by ddjtrkr: Nov 11 2004, 02:28 PM
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